Cybersecurity Awareness: Be Cyber Aware

Cybersecurity Awareness
April 18, 2019

Ways you can be cyber aware:

Master the Mouseover: Random, suspicious links most often can be ignored. When clicking on what appears to be a trusted source, it’s a good idea to hover over the link with your pointer and investigate the full URL. 

Mouseover on a Mobile Device: Depending on the device and the app, if you long-press on a link it will show you the full URL. The problem with this is you could accidentally click. Unless you’re 100 percent confident, don’t do it. Instead of clicking on a link of a known website that was sent to you, just manually type in the website address to ensure safe navigation.

Verify the Recipient:  When transferring sensitive information, verify it is accurate and going to the correct, authorized person(s). Think about it like this: sending the wrong info to the right person is just as bad as sending the right info to the wrong person. 

Be Aware of Your Surroundings:  Hacking isn’t always about computers, networks, and malicious links. It’s also about people, places, and things. Is the delivery guy really a delivery guy? Is that lady really from the internet provider, and does she really need access to the server room? Is that door at the end of the hall usually open or should it be locked? How long has that unmarked package been sitting in the lobby? Stay alert for scammers in the physical domain, ensure doors to secured areas remain closed, and verify the identity of unfamiliar persons. 

Privileged Access is a Privilege:  We all need access to certain information, systems, networks, buildings, and rooms to do our jobs. Protecting that access from unauthorized parties is a responsibility we all share! Keep your passwords private; don’t even share them with your loved ones. Avoid using shared accounts, even if it seems more convenient to do so. Never let someone tailgate or piggyback on your credentials. And if, for any reason, you think you have too much access, speak up! 

Reporting security incidents is an essential step in preventing cybercrime because it reduces the chances of the event happening again and if reported in a timely manner can prevent others from becoming victims. Even if something seems too small to report, it’s better to be safe than sorry. 

Contact Mike Wilson at mikewilson1@cwi.edu or 208.562.3193 with questions or for more information, and stay tuned for more tips and information on cybersecurity awareness in future issues of Bert’s Alerts.